Welcome to the latest edition of Cast & Hue’s Five on Friday newsletter. Each Friday, we deliver a quick summary of five items of note associated with the evolving healthcare consumer, strategy and marketing. We hope you find it interesting and useful!

hannbarczyk_npr_medical_finalart_wide-a94bf2714b29bf01cfe25f39dbbfae73b4de7a82-s800-c85

Many Dislike Healthcare System But Are Please With Their Own Care

NPR

Despite all of the advancements in care, patient experience, and technology, patients are still displeased with healthcare systems. This seems strange because many people report that they were impressed with their own personal care, but about 42 percent of Americans aren’t big fans of their healthcare systems. This article by Alison Kodjak for NPR dives into the reasons behind these numbers and offers tips to offer a more palatable patient experience and care process.

image-5

Tying Health IT to Consumers' Financial Health and Wellness

HealthPopuli

There is a major generational shift happening in the world of healthcare. Younger patients are waiting longer for treatment, but expect their providers and health information to be plugged in, connected, and electronically available whereas older generations are essentially the opposite. This article by Cruxpoints guest Jane Sarasohn-Kahn highlights these recent trends, the statistics that support them, and how we can connect finances to healthcare IT.

615_Health_Spending_Shutterstock_Scott_Hales

Why Patients Who Shop by Price Aren't Going to Slow Healthcare Spending

Modern Healthcare

The rise of high deductible health plans has prompted a shift for patients to act more like consumers and shop around for the best value when it comes to healthcare, but is that really going to slow healthcare spending. This article by Melanie Evans for Modern Healthcare says that it won’t. The article goes on to look into the costs that are controllable by the patients, those that are not, and how it all rounds up into seemingly marginal changes in healthcare spending.

01cancer-web1-master675

Waste in Cancer Drugs Costs $3 Billion a Year, Study Says

The New York Times

Medical waste is something that most people don’t concern themselves with, but could it be contributing to high drug prices and extra healthcare costs. A group of cancer researchers has found that between Medicare and private health insurers, three billion dollars in medicine that is thrown out every year. The reason? Manufacturers put too much in the bottle. This article by Gardiner Harris for the New York Times looks into the source of the waste, how it is affecting the healthcare community, and what we can do to change it.

File photo of Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump during a news conference in Palm Beach

Republican Trump Releases Healthcare Proposals

Reuters

This year’s Presidential election is really beginning to heat up. We’ve already heard a lot about healthcare reform from the Democratic candidates, but several of the Republican candidates have been playing their cards close to their chest. One of those candidates is none other that Republican party front-runner, Donald Trump. So far Trump has been a bit mysterious regarding his healthcare policy, but this article by Eric Walsh for Reuters sheds some light on Trump’s policies, how they differ from the other candidates, and what that means if he is elected.

That is it for this week. We hope you find value in this newsletter and invite you to share your thoughts in the comments section.

comments powered by Disqus